Some great sites among 23rd Malofiej winners

Malofiej 23

See highlights from this international awards festival for news graphics.

View a list of all winners (PDF; the online winners, pages 3–4, do not appear to be linked, but THEY ARE LINKED. Roll over carefully and you’ll find you can click them.)

Inspiring!

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What students said about this course in spring 2014

These are bona fide, unedited student comments from the official UF student course evaluations site. Those with no answer or “n/a” or “none” have been omitted. Students were all undergraduates in journalism or advertising who had no previous programming experience. Only eight students were enrolled in this course.

Qualities of instructor which contributed to success of the course:

“Her enthusiasm and clear description of the course and how much time we would have to devote to it to be successful.”

“She is very passionate about the course and the material which makes me what to learn more about the material as well.”

“Her enthusiasm for the subject material and our understanding of it made difficult course material easier to understand. She was always willing to give additional help, even outside of class and after work hours. The class was also broken down really intelligently so that we had a good foundation for more difficult material later in the course.”

“Ms. McAdams encouragement to play with code helped with my success in this course.” Continue reading

Examples of interactive journalism – Week 14

As always, add your own example for extra credit by providing a link in a reply to this post. (You still have two more chances to post, Weeks 15 and 16.)

A total of 18 animated and interactive charts make up this graphic from Bloomberg News: How Americans Die (published April 17). Sure, it’s not exactly a cheerful topic — but there’s good news in there. Our life expectancy has steadily improved since 1970.

How Americans Die chart 2 How Americans Die chart 1

What technologies were used? JavaScript! Specifically, a library called D3.js:

How Americans Die 3

Your Reply

Leave a comment on this post to submit your example for this week. Rules are on the Required Work page.

Make sure your link is correct and functional.

Include the title or headline of the example you are linking to.

Write one sentence about why we should appreciate it.

Examples of interactive journalism – Week 8

As always, add your own example for extra credit by providing a link in a reply to this post.

This week’s example, Empty Desks: Oregon’s Absenteeism Epidemic, comes from The Oregonian, which is not nearly as well known for data journalism as, say, The New York Times. The northwestern news organization has outdone itself on this excellent story about the consequences of kids skipping school, which is on the rise. The map below is just one example of the many appealing interactive charts and graphs in this package.

Oregonian absenteeism story

The graph below shows how the problem of absenteeism increases for high schools (red dots) in comparison with elementary schools (blue dots). Each dot provides more information when you roll over it.

Oregonian absenteeism 2

Your Reply

Leave a comment on this post to submit your example for this week. Rules are on the Required Work page.

Make sure your link is correct and functional.

Include the title or headline of the example you are linking to.

Write one sentence about why we should appreciate it.

Examples of interactive journalism – Week 6

As always, add your own example for extra credit by providing a link in a reply to this post.

During every Olympic Games, major news organizations create fascinating visual stories and data graphics for digital platforms. Even if you don’t care much about winter sports, these interactive and multimedia features provide a look at some of the best techniques for digital storytelling.

NYT - 2014 Olympics - Slopestyle

This week’s main example — Slopestyle – Mark McMorris – Sochi 2014 — comes from The New York Times. It’s not very interactive, but it is immersive, thanks to marvelous in-the-air and on-the-ground video photography.

Below, from Twitter:

Twitter Sochi 2014 photo collage

This Olympic Games photo collage is updated daily, showing images from Sochi that people have tweeted . Each day’s most-tweeted images are shown, and they are clickable, leading back to an original tweet. You can see a different selection of images for each day.

Your Reply

Leave a comment on this post to submit your example for this week. Rules are on the Required Work page.

Make sure your link is correct and functional.

Include the title or headline of the example you are linking to.

Write one sentence about why we should appreciate it.

Examples of interactive journalism – Week 3

This post has two purposes: (1) To present an example of interactive journalism that I recommend; and (2) To allow you to reply with a new link to an example of interactive journalism that YOU recommend.

It is optional for you to post a link. If you do, it counts toward extra credit (provided it meets the criteria). You can read the details on the Required Work page, under the subheading “Extra credit.” See previous example posts by clicking the Examples link in the sidebar.

Your link and reply must meet the requirements spelled out on the Required Work page.

My example for you this week — Here’s Where Your iPhone Got Lost Or Stolen — is NOT interactive, but it shows you how a journalist used Python to collect data (from Craigslist) and then write a totally original story, with charts. (Your examples still need to be interactive ones.) The charts here could be more beautiful, in my opinion. But the story’s the thing, and the reporter got this story with Python.

BONUS: The journalist, Nicole Martinelli, wrote a separate account of how she used Python to get these data.

Bar chart: Places where iPhones are most commonly lost

Pie chart: Days of the week when iPhones are most often lost

Your Reply

Leave a comment on this post to submit your example for this week.

Make sure your link is correct and functional.

Include the title or headline of the example you are linking to.

Write one sentence about why we should appreciate it.