Examples of interactive journalism – Week 15

As always, add your own example for extra credit by providing a link in a reply to this post. (You still have one more chance to post, in Week 16.)

This week’s example — Time 100: The Most Influential People in the World in 2014 — was designed by students in a Communication and Multimedia Design course at a university in the Netherlands. Spend some time clicking on people and then returning to the grid. Do you have ideas for how this might be improved?

Time 100

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Leave a comment on this post to submit your example for this week. Rules are on the Required Work page.

Make sure your link is correct and functional.

Include the title or headline of the example you are linking to.

Write one sentence about why we should appreciate it.

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Examples of interactive journalism – Week 10

As always, add your own example for extra credit by providing a link in a reply to this post.

This week’s example, The ‘Boys’ in the Bunkhouse, from The New York Times, has several not-so-flashy JavaScript effects that are worth thinking about. It uses the responsive Foundation framework — check out its features!

A very obvious use of JavaScript appears about one-fourth of the way down the page (see the third image below): click the gray-boxed text or the pullout text on the right side, and an image of a document reveals itself in-line with the main text.

Boys NYTimes March 2014

Boys 2 NYTimes March 2014

Boys 3 NYTimes March 2014

Boys 4 NYTimes March 2014

Your Reply

Leave a comment on this post to submit your example for this week. Rules are on the Required Work page.

Make sure your link is correct and functional.

Include the title or headline of the example you are linking to.

Write one sentence about why we should appreciate it.

Examples of interactive journalism – Week 6

As always, add your own example for extra credit by providing a link in a reply to this post.

During every Olympic Games, major news organizations create fascinating visual stories and data graphics for digital platforms. Even if you don’t care much about winter sports, these interactive and multimedia features provide a look at some of the best techniques for digital storytelling.

NYT - 2014 Olympics - Slopestyle

This week’s main example — Slopestyle – Mark McMorris – Sochi 2014 — comes from The New York Times. It’s not very interactive, but it is immersive, thanks to marvelous in-the-air and on-the-ground video photography.

Below, from Twitter:

Twitter Sochi 2014 photo collage

This Olympic Games photo collage is updated daily, showing images from Sochi that people have tweeted . Each day’s most-tweeted images are shown, and they are clickable, leading back to an original tweet. You can see a different selection of images for each day.

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Leave a comment on this post to submit your example for this week. Rules are on the Required Work page.

Make sure your link is correct and functional.

Include the title or headline of the example you are linking to.

Write one sentence about why we should appreciate it.

Examples of interactive journalism – Week 5

As always, add your own example for extra credit by providing a link in a reply to this post.

This week’s example — Wolves at the Door, from NPR — is multimedia but not interactive. It should make you think about design choices (using HTML and CSS). It has no video but it includes evocative sound and beautiful photos. The amount of text is minimal. Enjoy it on a large screen with headphones, or at least with your volume turned up. How do you feel about the experience? Do you think NPR should have added a map and maybe a few infographics to convey data about the wolf populations?

Screen capture - story from NPR

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Leave a comment on this post to submit your example for this week. Rules are on the Required Work page.

Make sure your link is correct and functional.

Include the title or headline of the example you are linking to.

Write one sentence about why we should appreciate it.

Examples of interactive journalism – Week 4

As always, add your own example for extra credit by providing a link in a reply to this post.

I’m really excited about this week’s example of interactive journalism: In flight: See the planes in the sky right now, from The Guardian.

Using real-time data, a world map shows all the flights currently flying, everywhere on earth, RIGHT NOW. You can zoom in, and you can also rewind time to 24 hours ago. The package also includes a mini-documentary (see links at bottom edge) about the history of commercial air travel, which, as it happens, started in Tampa, Florida, in 1914. There are some nice data graphics in the fourth section, “Hitting the Limits?”

This review provides a little background about how the package was made.

Screen capture: In flight

Your Reply

Leave a comment on this post to submit your example for this week. Rules are on the Required Work page.

Make sure your link is correct and functional.

Include the title or headline of the example you are linking to.

Write one sentence about why we should appreciate it.

Examples of interactive journalism – Week 2

This post has two purposes: (1) To present an example of interactive journalism that I recommend; and (2) To allow you to reply with a new link to an example of interactive journalism that YOU recommend.

It is optional for you to post a link. If you do, it counts toward extra credit (provided it meets the criteria). You can read the details on the Required Work page, under the subheading “Extra credit.”

Do not post more than one link here.

Your link must be functional — that is, I click it, and it goes directly to the example you wrote about.

Do not reply more than once to this post.

After the next “Examples” post appears on this blog (that will happen on Monday, Jan. 20), any new replies made here will not count.

An example I recommend

My example this week, NSA Files: Decoded, was published by The Guardian in November 2013. The story responds to your scrolling by playing embedded videos, in which experts speak instead of being represented in text. In other words, the videos replace what would normally appear as a quote in the text at that spot in the story.

There’s more interactivity as the story continues. Check out the Three Degrees of Separation graphic and see how your Facebook friends expose yo to surveillance by the NSA. Or find out how (not) diverse the Judges of the FISA Court are.

There’s a very interesting backstory about how this online story was produced. The journalists literally tell you how they made this.

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Leave a comment on this post to submit your example for this week.

Make sure your link is correct and functional.

Include the title or headline of the example you are linking to.

Write one sentence about why we should appreciate it.

Examples of interactive journalism – Week 15

To see all posts in the “Examples” series, view the category “Examples.”

This is the next-to-last post in this series.

This week’s example, Reframing Mexico (2011), was produced by students — a group from the j-school at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and a group from Tec de Monterrey University, Mexico. It’s a big package of many different stories, including information graphics, videos, and more. The visual design is rather old-school — there are even some Flash interactives inside — but the sliding features are all jQuery.

You should spend some time with this and see what you think about it. Make some notes about what you like, and what you don’t, and why. Sometimes a collection like this can seem too overwhelming to the site visitor. If that’s how you feel, what would you do to improve the experience?

Reframing Mexico

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Leave a comment on this post to submit your example for this week.

  • Post only ONE link.
  • Make sure your link is correct and functional.
  • Include the title or headline of the example you are linking to.
  • Write one sentence about why we should appreciate it.

Read the details and rules on the Required Work page, under the subheading “Extra credit.”